Project CARS 2 - Top Tips and Help | ApexOnlineRacing.com

Project CARS 2 - Top Tips and Help


Oto Winkler

Formula 4 1st Driver
Mar 3, 2020
149
70
I know I'm not @Yorkie065 but I think I can still give you a pretty good answer to the question.
I think one needs to feel how the car feels as well as look at the laptimes. More often than not it may seem like the tyre wear is bad from the HUD but in reality it doesn't feel all that bad and times are only dropping a little and sometimes not at all. It all depends on what track you're on, which car you're in, what tyre compound you use etc. etc.
If I had to give a general answer for undoubtedly the most popular cars in the game, GT3, I would say it has to be really bad for you to want to change tyres. At least in an either full wet or full dry race. I often find myself not really feeling a big difference until the tyre meter is completely gone. But as I said, it all depends on the situation.
Anyways, that's just my 2 cents from a driver who's actively driven both first and second game since the release of PC1 back in 2015 :)
Thanks buddy. I was testing with accelerated wear and to simulate 35 laps in half time. Yeah, they were quite OK as far as I didn't overheat them.
 

Yorkie065

SMS Representative
Staff member
PCARS Coordinator
AOR Commentator
Jan 19, 2014
1,633
2,544
Thanks buddy. I was testing with accelerated wear and to simulate 35 laps in half time. Yeah, they were quite OK as far as I didn't overheat them.
TPW pretty much hit the nail on the head in that all depends on feel and times. Generally, the best time is when the tyre gauge is pretty much empty and just before the tyres drop off massively and you lose lap time. The gauge itself represents the 1st 50% of the rubber available on the tyre, so you can go further if you want but after that gauge and 1st 50% is worn, you're starting to wear into the carcass, which is where the lap times and grip drops away rapidly, so you want to be pitting before then.

One thing to make note of is that the tyre does kind of wear at different rates throughout the race and as you work through the rubber. For instance you may experience what looks like a lot of wear in the first few laps where you notice a decent change in the gauge, but as you keep going, the wear rate slows a fair amount. With that in mind, it's best to test longer stint lengths when trying to get an idea for tyre wear as the first 5-10 laps may not actually be representative and make the wear rate appear to be worse than it actually is.
 

Oto Winkler

Formula 4 1st Driver
Mar 3, 2020
149
70
TPW pretty much hit the nail on the head in that all depends on feel and times. Generally, the best time is when the tyre gauge is pretty much empty and just before the tyres drop off massively and you lose lap time. The gauge itself represents the 1st 50% of the rubber available on the tyre, so you can go further if you want but after that gauge and 1st 50% is worn, you're starting to wear into the carcass, which is where the lap times and grip drops away rapidly, so you want to be pitting before then.

One thing to make note of is that the tyre does kind of wear at different rates throughout the race and as you work through the rubber. For instance you may experience what looks like a lot of wear in the first few laps where you notice a decent change in the gauge, but as you keep going, the wear rate slows a fair amount. With that in mind, it's best to test longer stint lengths when trying to get an idea for tyre wear as the first 5-10 laps may not actually be representative and make the wear rate appear to be worse than it actually is.
Thanks Yorkie
 

lappedagain

Formula 4 2nd Driver
Mar 20, 2020
117
72
When I first started I tried using as little ABS and TC as possible to get more realism.
Whenever you bump the TC and ABS way up it may be slightly slower but much more
consistent and less mishaps!
Still seems a bit unfair and unrealistic.
 
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